8/16/2016

GOAT shares new track "Alarms" (from 'Requiem')

GOAT shares “Alarms,” a new track from Requiem, their forthcoming album 

Listen: http://u.subpop.com/2biNVnc
Photo credit: Andreas Johansson

Requiem is out October 7th, 2016  in North America on Sub Pop Records, Stranded Rekords in Nordic countries, and Rocket Recordings in the rest of the world

We’re pleased to share “Alarms,” the latest offering from GOAT’s forthcoming longplayerRequiem, which is out October 7th via Sub Pop Records in North America, Stranded Rekords in Nordic countries, and Rocket Recordings in the rest of the world. “Alarms” highlights the folk influence that runs through Requiem, with acoustic guitars and hand-percussion instruments driving thesong, while retaining the hypnotic vocals and fuzz-drenched guitar leads the band is known for.

Requiem finds GOAT focusing more on their subdued, bucolic ritualism than psilocybin freakouts, with a pronounced folk-rock influence pervading the album.  But GOAT hasn’t foregone their fiery charms—tracks like “All-Seeing Eye” and “Goatfuzz” conjure the sultry pulsations that ensnared us on 2012’s World Music and 2014’s Commune.

Requiem will be available in North America on CD / 2xLP / DL / CASS on October 7th, 2016. You can preorder the band’s new record here. LP pre-orders through the Sub Pop Mega Mart and independent retailers will receive the limited Loser Edition on translucent red vinyl with black streaks (while supplies last).

GOAT recently announced some European shows, with more dates to follow. Please find a current live schedule below.

Listen: “Alarms”
Listen: “Try My Robe”
Watch: Album Trailer
 

More on GOAT: 
In a culture obsessed with content, saturation, and continual exposure, it’s rare to find artists who prefer to lurk outside of the public eye. Thomas Pynchon is perhaps the most notable contemporary recluse—a virtually faceless figure who occasionally creeps out of hiding to offer up an elaborate novel steeped in history and warped by imagination—but for the crate digging audiophiles, guitar mystics, and third-eye visionaries, Sweden’s enigmatic rock outfit GOAT may qualify as the greatest modern pop-culture mystery. Who are these masked musicians? Are they truly members of a remote tribe in the Arctic community of Korpilombolo? Are their songs actually a part of their communal heritage, passed down through generations in their isolated homeland? Their third studio full-length,Requiem, offers more questions than answers, but much like any of Pynchon’s knotty yarns, the reward is not in the untangling but in the journey through the labyrinth.

Western exports may have dominated the consciousness of international rock fans for the entirety of the 20th century, but our increasing global awareness has unearthed a treasure trove of transcendental grooves and spellbinding riffage from exotic and remote corners of the planet. GOAT’s previous albums World Music and Commune were perfect testaments to this heightened awareness, with Silk Road psychedelia, desert blues, and Third World pop all serving as governing forces within the band’s sound. But GOAT’s strange amalgam isn’t some cheap game of cultural appropriation—it’s nearly impossible to pinpoint the exact origins of the elusive group’s sound. Whether or not the enigmatic collective truly claims Korpilombolo as their home, the fact that they pledge allegiance to a spot on the periphery of our maps—a spot so distant and off the grid that it feels fictitious—bolsters the nomadic quality of their sonic explorations. With Requiem, GOAT
continue to rock and writhe to a beat beholden to no nation, no state.

GOAT’s only outright declaration for Requiem is that it is their “folk” album. For the initiated, such a proclamation seems almost unnecessary—GOAT has always vacillated between electrified exuberance and unplugged tribalist hymns. But Requiem does find GOAT focusing more on their subdued bucolic ritualism than on the psilocybin freakouts. Opening tracks “Djorolen/Union of Sun and Moon” and “I Sing in Silence” both set the stage for GOAT’s rustic approach, with the guitars laying down simple chord progressions and pan flute providing the primary hooks. From those very first notes, the 
piper leads us down a path where GOAT relies less on acidic guitar lines and more on sun-bleached psych-pop. “Trouble in the Streets” carries all the jubilance of classic African highlife. “Try My Robe” bares the group’s signature ceremonial hip-shaking rhythms, but eschews guitar for a mandolin line that would make John Paul Jones proud. But GOAT hasn’t completely foregone their fiery charms—tracks like “All-Seeing Eye” and “Goatfuzz” conjure the sultry heathen pulsations that ensnared us on their previous albums.

Perhaps the most puzzling aspect of Requiem comes with the closing track “Ubuntu”. The song is little more than a melodic delay-driven electric piano 
line, until we hear the refrain from “Diarabi”—the first song on their first album—sneak into the mix. It creates a kind of musical ouroboros—an infinite cycle of reflection and rejuvenation, death and rebirth. Much like fellow recluse Pynchon, GOAT doesn’t offer up any explanations for their strange trajectories. But like Pynchon, they have managed to create a world of their own where the line between truth and fiction is so obscured that all you can do is bask in their cryptic genius.

What People Are Saying About GOAT:
"The track is a characteristic of the clan - wild, full of colour, and a celebration."  ["Try My Robe"] - DIY 

"these fresh GOAT-y sounds are tantalising meshes of brilliance and surreality." ["Try My Robe"] - Line of Best Fit

"The band is all about fusion, snagging sounds from all over the world to create a knotty blend of Western psychedelia and Eastern instrumentation." ["Try My Robe"] Consequence of Sound

“GOAT's second album balances all that joy with the darkness of krautrock: The band Can and its minimalist excursions come to mind, but then there are also moments that would fit comfortably as an artifact from the first psychedelic era circa 1968. The song titles on Commune ("Talk To God," "
Goatchild," "Goatslaves," "Gathering Of Ancient Tribes") tell a story, even when it's hard to make out the words. Throughout, the album's strong, clear vibe positively calls out for listeners to don face paint and grab a cowbell — or even a tambourine.” [Commune, First Listen] - NPR MUSIC

“...
Frantic percussive combination of acid-spiked psych-rock, groove-centric Afrobeat, dazed metal, euphoric disco, and unearthly funk.” - Stereogum

“...A psychedelic rock ritual of rhythm, motion, hypnotic r
epetitionand ecstatic drive.” [Live review] - New York Times

Tour Dates
Aug. 28 - Torino, IT - Todays
Sep. 02 - Aarhus, DK - Aarhus Festival
Sep. 03 - Wiltshire, United Kingdom - End of the Road Festival
Oct. 07 - Malmö, SE - Babel
Oct. 08 -  Köpenhamn, DK - Den grå
hal
Oct. 10 - Köln, DE - Stadtgarten
Oct. 11 - München, DE - Ampere
Oct. 12 - Berlin, DE  - Berghain
Oct. 13 - Heidelberg, DE - Karlstorbahnhof EnjoyJazz
Oct. 14 - Paris, FR - Cabaret Sauvage
Oct. 16 - Antwerp, BE - Desertfest
Oct. 17 - Brighton, UK - All Saints Church
Oct. 18 - London, UK - Coronet
Oct. 19 - Bristol, UK - SWX
Oct. 20 - Newcastle, UK - Riverside
Oct. 21 - Glasgow, UK - 02 ABC
Oct. 22 - Manchester, UK - Albert Hall
Nov. 11-12 - Oslo, NO - Oslo Psych Fest

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