6/27/2016

MODDI Uncovers Kate Bush's 'Army Dreamers'

MODDI UNCOVERS KATE BUSH’S ‘ARMY DREAMERS’
TAKEN FROM ‘UNSONGS’ LP – OUT SEPT 16 – 12 BANNED SONGS FROM 12 COUNTRIES

“Unsongs, a brave and bold album where he covers Pussy Riot, Billie Holiday
and executed Chilean folk singer Victor Jara... Moddi repairs a broken link
between art and politics, refusing to allow those in power to threaten or
control what is allowed to be expressed in song.” 
– The Line Of Best Fit

“Informed by a political entanglement of his own, Norwegian artist Moddi is releasing 
a concept album of songs that have fallen foul of the censor.” – Q Magazine

“What causes a song to be banned? Norwegian musician Pål Moddi Knutsen 
decided to find out… 12 banned songs, one album.” – BBC World Service

“Pure protest poetry” – BBC Radio 6 Music, Cerys Matthews Recommends

 “Truly stunning” – Nothing But Hope and Passion

Also featured on USA Today, Songlines and CMU: Approved
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“What a waste of Army Dreamers” – it’s an anti-war sentiment that was openly echoed through BBC playlists before its systematic suppression more than 10 years after release. Penned by Kate Bush in 1980, the Top 20 single was blacklisted during the Gulf War in 1991 – joining a list of 67 songs simultaneously banned from BBC airplay, including The Beatles, Frank Sinatra, ABBA and Queen.

It’s the latest track reworked by Norwegian singer/songwriter Moddi, from forthcoming album ‘Unsongs’ – released Friday, September 16 via Propeller Recordings. The album aims to uncover a collection of 12 songs that have, at one stage or another, been banned or suppressed, with the attempts to silence them as mild as an airplay ban (in the case of ‘Army Dreamers’) and as brutal as a murder. >> Stream/embed Moddi’s take on ‘Army Dreamers’ below... 

“Army Dreamers became one of Kate Bush’s most popular songs and was widely played on radio and TV until the First Gulf War in 1991, when it suddenly disappeared from all BBC playlists” Moddi explains. Despite online records and a full list published by New Statesman and Society, in conjunction with Channel 4 [1991], “the BBC has had an absolute no-comment policy on this issue,” he says. “It has been impossible for me to verify that it has even been removed from radio airplay.”

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